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Fabrics Made of Food

Fabrics Made of Food
In light of the German designer who is making clothes with fabric made from milk fibers,
Cincy Chic brings you some of the best clothes made from things you can eat.

 

BioBiker_Jacket.jpgThe fashion world is buzzing with the news that Anka Domaske, a German designer, has crafted a clothing line made of what our moms made sure we drank at the dinner table. The fabric has the feel of silk, and a dress requires only around a gallon and a half of milk, according to a story by National Public Radio.

 

The brand is called Qmilch - milch is the German for milk - and the website touts the product as "the world's first industrial-strength fiber that is manufactured using an environmentally friendly process without any chemicals."

 

So, what are the benefits of fabric made from milk protein? Well, first of all, the production is completely organic, has antibacterial properties and is hypoallergenic, according to Qmilch's website.

 

Those seem to be pretty compelling reasons to start Krombholz Jewelerswearing your milk, but what are some other food fabrics to try? Here are a few:
Soybean

It's a great source of protein, and now you can wear it to dinner. Clothing made from soybean fibers is another organic alternative. The benefits of soybean fabrics include a higher breaking point than those of wool, cotton or silk; comfortable fit similar to that of silk-cashmere blends; and a good draping property.

 

Green Tea
BioCouture
has figured out a way to use a sugary green tea solution to literally grow clothes. The director of the project is Suzanne Lee, a senior research fellow at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London. The fabric is eco-friendly, as it allows wearers to compost the clothing after they no longer want it, and the material requires less dye than other fabrics, making it a more sustainable alternative, according to the website.

 

Coconut
Natural fiber made from coconuts, called coir, offers a lot of benefits to your run-of-the-mill cotton. Coir is also used to stop soil erosion and break up wild fires, according to Granite Environmental. When worn, coir is durable and water-resistant - as its work in preventing erosion would indicate.

Alyssa Howard -

Alyssa Howard is Cincy Chic's editor. Email her at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

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